Posts Tagged ‘posaholic’

Posiholic versus Negaholic

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

Isn’t it funny how we as humans so easily focus on any problem, and yet even easier forget about all the great things that have happened?

Step back from your day-to-day thinking about the company you work for or run, from the team or department you work in, from the people you work around and with. Is everything perfect in these worlds? I doubt it. But is everything wrong with them? I highly doubt that too.

  • How many good decisions have been made by your boss or organization over the past year or so?
  • How many good things have been accomplished over the past year or so?
  • How many good things have you been allowed to do over the past year or so?
  • How many good people do you work with?

Now, compare those answers to all the negatives. Compare that with the things that have not gone perfectly.

I once asked a manager who was having performance issues with an employee (an employee she wanted to fire for doing such a poor job) what percentage of the time he did the wrong things and made mistakes. After a little thought she replied, “About 5 to 10 percent of the time.” Which meant that this “problem employee” did the right things 90 to 95 percent of the time.

Isn’t it funny how we tend to focus on the negative, and forget the positive?

Or maybe it isn’t so funny.

I follow the philosophy that if we focus on doing the right things and on using our strengths, we won’t have time to do the wrong things or use our weaknesses.

Here’s your challenge for the next week (should you decide to accept): Take every negative thing that happens or you hear about and stop and re-think or reframe how you perceive them. Instead of seeing the negative, flip it around and think about the positives. There are always positives – sometimes you just need to look for them. And yes, sometimes there are no positives in one particular situation, so you then have to look outside that situation.

Are you ready to give it a try for a week? Be a posiholic, rather than a negaholic.